French In Name Only

A Genealogical Blog about the French and Grace Families

Month: November 2014

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Advertising for Grandparents!

WJGraceMy great grandfather William J. Grace was born  in Meriden, Connecticut in 1859.  His parents, Michael (b. 1825) and Catherine Grace (b. 1828), were both were emigrants from Ireland.  In 1886, William was working as a “horse-shoer and blacksmith” in Meriden, Connecticut (see advertisement).  It was in Meriden that he met his bride, Mary Ellen Courtney, who lived with her parents (Michael and Bridget) just a few houses away from where he lived at 63 Arch Street. After their marriage, William and Mary moved to New Britain (Ct.) where he continued his trade.

My second great grandfather Michael Daly was born in Ireland in 1835.  Michael appears in the Waterbury, Connecticut City Directory in 1863 under the occupation of dyer located on Grand Street (text of 1876-77 advertisement below). Michael married Hannah Mulcahy, who was the daughter of Michael and Ellena (Connell) of Ballyvatta, County Cork, Ireland.

Daly – Dyer and Cleanser

Grand Street, Waterbury Conn.

Ladies and Gentlemen’s garments of every description, dyed to any color desired. Gentlemen’s garments dyed or cleansed without ripping. Shawles, Table Spreads, Blankets, Lace and Muslin Curtains cleaned and finished in the latest styles.  Silk, Cotton and Wollen Dresses dyed all colors, and cleaned and finished in a superior manner.

The son of William Grace (Raymond) married the granddaughter of Michael Daly (Mary Catherine), they were my grandparents. 

© David R. French and French in Name Only, 2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David French and French in Name Only with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

John S. French Sr. – In Honor of Veterans Day

“In the simplest of terms, what we are doing in Korea is this: We are trying to prevent a third world war.” Harry S. Truman, April 16, 1951.

My father, John Spencer French (1931-2014), served during the Korean War from 1953-1954 (U.S. Army 60th Ordnance Group).  During his deployment in Korea, he obtained a camera and documented his buddies and captured amazing images of Seoul, Tokyo and eventually his return through the Golden Gate Bridge.  My dad is the handsome guy standing in front of gray stucco wall and posing on the bridge in the last.  Thank you to all military service members, those who have served and those who are serving our country.

© David R. French and French in Name Only, 2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David French and French in Name Only with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Thank You Fellow Genealogists

FamilyCloud

 

Gratitude

Since embarking on this new adventure in October 2014 to establish a family blog, those in the genealogy community have been kind enough to recognize and publicize my work. Make sure you check out these wonderful blogs.

Jana’s Genealogy and Family History BlogNew Blog Discoveries

GeneaBloggersNew Genealogy Blogs

Famous Inventive Cousins – Way, Way Removed

A.J. Jacobs wrote a wonderful opinion piece in the New York Times entitled, Are You My Cousin?, in which he opined, “we’re all related — we just have to figure out how.”  The genesis of my famous “cousins” is my 9th great grandfather William French who set sail for Massachusetts in 1635. Highlighted in this post are Charles Goodyear, Samuel Morse and Eli Whitney.  I recognize the exponential nature of genealogy and take any connection to these famous individuals with a grain of salt.  
Read on to learn more!


WilliamFrenchWilliam French – On July 18, 1635, William and his family boarded the ship Defence, bound for America. They landed at Boston on October 8th. The passenger list showed William, Elizabeth, and children Elizabeth (age 6), Mary (age 2) and John (age 5 months). William was entered on the passenger list as a servant to Roger Harlakenden. The French family settled first at Cambridge, and they had six children born there. William was made a freeman on March 3, 1636 and a member of the Ancient & Honorable Artillery Company in 1638. His home in Cambridge was on what is now the west side of Dunster Street about midway between Harvard Square and Mt. Auburn Street.

In 1653, William became one of the first settlers of the town of Billerica (which was first called Shawshin). In March 1660, he was chosen as one of the first five selectmen. He was the first representative of Billerica at the General Court in Boston, chosen in 1660 and taking his seat in 1663. He became a lieutenant of the militia, and afterwards, a captain. As a lieutenant, he did garrison duty during King Philip’s War.  (More on William French can be found on this excellent blog – Ancestor Biographies)

Ties to William

Charles Goodyear (1800-1860), American inventor, experimented with, perfected, and promoted the use of vulcanized rubber. He was instrumental in establishing the rubber industry in the United States.

1   William French 1603 – 1681Goodyear
..  +Elizabeth 1606 – 1668
…. 2   Francis French 1624 – 1681
……..  +Lydia Bunnell 1643 – 1708
……….. 3   Hannah Jane French 1679 –
……………  +John Towner 1679 –
……………… 4   Eunice Towner 1710 –
………………….  +Israel Curtiss 1710 –
…………………… 5   Eunice Curtiss 1740 –
……………………….  +Stephen Bateman 1740 –
…………………………. 6   Cynthia Bateman 1770 –
……………………………..  +Amasa Goodyear 1770 –
……………………………….. 7   Charles Goodyear 1800 – 1860

Samuel Morse (1791-1872), inventor of the magnetic telegraph, became impressed with the idea that signals, representing figures and letters, might he transmitted to any distance by means of an electric spark over an insulated wire. He devised a system of dots and spaces to represent letters and words, to he interpreted by a telegraphic dictionary.

Morse1   William French 1603 – 1681
..  +Elizabeth 1606 – 1668
…. 2   Sarah French 1638 – 1694
……..  +Jonathan Peake II 1637 – 1700
……….. 3   Jonathan Peake III 1663 – 1744
……………  +Hannah Leavens 1666 – 1756
……………… 4   Sarah Peake 1702 –
………………….  +John Morse 1699 – 1764
…………………… 5   Jedediah Morse 1726 – 1819
……………………….  +Sarah Child 1722 – 1805
…………………………. 6   Jedediah Morse 1761 – 1819
……………………………..  +Elizabeth Ann Breeze 1761 –
……………………………….. 7   Samuel Finley Breeze Morse 1791 – 1872

Eli Whitney (1765-1825), American inventor, best known for his invention of the cotton gin, designed and built a model for a machine that would separate the seeds from the fibers of the short-staple cotton plant, work that until that time had been done by hand. He completed the machine-the first cotton gin-in 1793. This invention had a great impact on the development of the southern United States.

In 1798, Whitney turned to the large-scale manufacture of firearms. After signing a contract to supply the federal government with 10,000 military muskets, he built a factory near New Haven, at present-day Hamden, in which he experimented with a system of manufacturing standardized, interchangeable parts. He died in New Haven on January 8, 1825.

1   William French 1603 – 1681Whitney
…+ Mary Lathrop 1640 – 1735 (2nd Wife)
…. 2   Hannah French 1676 – 1766
……..  +John Child II 1669 – 1748
……….. 3   Mary Child 1700 – 1776
……………  +Nathaniel Whitney III 1696 – 1776
……………… 4   Eli Whitney, Sr. 1740 – 1807
………………….  +Elizabeth Fay 1740 – 1777
…………………… 5   Eli Whitney 1765 – 1825

© David R. French and French in Name Only, 2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David French and French in Name Only with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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